Research

Newer Page 2 Older

  • Policing online abuse or policing women? Our submission to the United Nations on online violence against women

    The United Nations’ Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women, Its Causes and Consequences (‘SRVAW’) issued a call for input and information on online violence against women – particularly on the manner in which legal frameworks, courts and intermediaries in different countries recognise online abuse and provide redressal mechanisms for the same. The Internet Democracy Project made a submission outlining India’s fairly comprehensive legal framework for online abuse. We believe that the focus of all stakeholders should not be on the creation of more laws to address online abuse, since such an approach disregards the influence of prevailing social norms on the interpretation and implementation of laws in India. We therefore, made suggestions for the adoption of more non-legal measures instead.   More

    Research

  • India’s Universal Periodic Review – third cycle: Stakeholder report by the Internet Democracy Project

    The Universal Periodic Review (UPR) is a United Nations Human Rights Council mechanism to assess how member States fare on their human rights record. Every 4.5 years, each member state of the UN is reviewed by the UPR Working Group for the State’s performance under international human rights obligations. The review is based on (a) a national report submitted by the State under review (b) reports of independent human rights experts and treaty bodies © reports from other stakeholders including non-governmental organisations. In this report, the Internet Democracy Project has highlighted the challenges to realising human rights on the Internet, in India. More information on the UPR process can be found here.   More

    Research

  • Coalition report of Universal Periodic Review for India – third cycle: Internet rights

    A coalition of organisations submitted a report towards the Universal Periodic Review of India for consideration at the 27th Session of United Nations Working Group to take place in 2017. The coalition includes Digital Empowerment Foundation, the Internet Democracy Project, Point of View, Nazdeek and Association of Progressive Communications. More information about the Universal Periodic Review process can be found here.   More

    Research

  • Towards setting goalposts: Our comments to pre-consultation paper on net neutrality

    The Telecom Regulatory Authority of India issued a pre-consultation paper on network neutrality, and invited comments from stakeholders. The Internet Democracy Project made a submission, asking that the consultation result in a clear and overarching framework that strengthens the freedom of expression that the Internet has enabled, and makes strong protections for user privacy, secures user choice by minimising Internet service provider interference and ensures healthy competition in the telecommunications and applications market.   More

    Research

  • Against the undermining of discriminatory tariffs regulation: Our comments to TRAI consultation paper on Free Data

    The Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) invited comments on their consultation paper No. 7/2016 on Free Data. The Internet Democracy Project submitted comments to TRAI, asking the regulator to take steps that would lead to the strengthening of the Prohibition of Discriminatory Tariffs for Data Services, 2016 Regulation, by giving business models which do not come under that regulation, but run the risk of having similar harms as discriminatory pricing, the same regulatory treatment. In general, we urge TRAI to develop a principle-based framework to preserve the Internet’s ability to function as an open and free infrastructure, which expands and refines principles that it has started to develop with the discriminatory tariffs regulation.   More

    Research

  • Our comments on the draft Geospatial Information Regulation Bill

    The Ministry of Home Affairs invited comments on the draft Geospatial Information Regulation Bill’. Through this, the ministry seeks to regulate the acquisition, dissemination, publication and distribution of geospatial information of India which is likely to affect the security, sovereignty and integrity of India. The Internet Democracy Project* submitted comments to the ministry, outlining reasons why the draft bill does not succeed in addressing the national security concerns, while at the same time being disastrous for businesses, communities and individuals alike.    More

    Research

  • India and the Budapest Convention: To sign or not? Considerations for Indian stakeholders

    In 2001, the Convention on Cybercrime of the Council of Europe, also known as the Cybercrime Convention or the Budapest Convention, became the first binding international instrument to foster a common criminal policy and international cooperation to battle cybercrime in signatory States. Whether or not India should join the Convention has, since then, been a topic of intense debate. In this paper, we consider the Convention’s major strengths and weaknesses in five areas of crucial importance to Indian stakeholders. To sign or not? There might not be an easy answer, as we will show.   More

    Research

  • India at the Internet’s root? Understanding India’s pitch for a root server

    This paper was co-authored by Dr. Anja Kovacs and Rajat Rai Handa.    More

    In September 2015, news reports noted that India had pitched with the United States (US) for a root zone server to be placed within the country. What to make of India’s request? In order to fully understand the weight, import and potential consequences of India’s stance, it is essential to gain a deeper understanding of the root zone, its functioning and its management, as well as of India’s historical positions on related issues. In this paper, we aim to aid such understanding in several steps as we examine both a variety of technical aspects involved and the larger politico-strategic context in which India’s bid has to be understood. 

    Research

  • Defending India’s Critical Information Infrastructure

    With the establishment of the National Critical Information Infrastructure Protection Centre (NCIIPC) in 2014, India has taken an important measure towards strengthening its cybersecurity. But while the establishment of NCIIPC as such is a positive step forward, several shortcomings mark, however, its implementation. In this paper, I will first briefly outline the origin and development of NCIIPC and will then go on to critically examine three challenges or limitations in particular: NCIIPC’s command and control structure; fallacies in the framework that was used to rank sectors in order of criticality; and the absence of sector-specific guidelines and standard operating procedures (SoPs). As we will see, each of these contributes to important vulnerabilities remaining in India’s critical information infrastructure (CII).   More

    Research

  • Cybersecurity, Internet governance and India’s foreign policy: Antecedents and the way forward for non-governmental stakeholders

    On 27 February, 2016, the Internet Democracy Project organised a national meeting of non-governmental stakeholders at the India Habitat Centre in Delhi, to discuss the findings of its latest research study, Cybersecurity, Internet Governance and India’s Foreign Policy: Historical Antecedents’ by Mr. Saikat Datta. In this report, we summarise the findings of the discussions.   More

    Research